International Foreign Exchange Master Agreement (IFEMA)

Instaforex has been one of the prominent Islamic friendly forex brokers Instaforex offers Islamic friendly, swap free accounts. Traders can also convert their regular accounts into swap free accounts by signing a swap free forex agreement.

Instaforex has been one of the prominent Islamic friendly forex brokers Instaforex offers Islamic friendly, swap free accounts. Traders can also convert their regular accounts into swap free accounts by signing a swap free forex agreement. submitted by FX_Winner to Forex [link] [comments]

EU leaders reached an agreement on the €750 bill. recovery fund. Copy of Live Forex Trading Session.

EU leaders reached an agreement on the €750 bill. recovery fund. Copy of Live Forex Trading Session. submitted by Tin100 to Livetradingbroaadcast [link] [comments]

@AlphaexCapital : Cable hits five-month highs as pound jumps after UK and EU reach Brexit agreement https://t.co/O71DZFDjBr #forex #forextrading #investing

submitted by AlphaexCapital to AlphaexCapital [link] [comments]

@AlphaexCapital : Cable hits five-month highs as pound jumps after UK and EU reach Brexit agreement https://t.co/URyZhIKisM #forex #forextrading #investing

submitted by AlphaexCapital to AlphaexCapital [link] [comments]

01-19 16:14 - 'Hi, I have one question about gti net. It's look like ponzi scheme. how you are sure that this forex trading is real? / Do you have some legal agreement with the company? Because I can't find detailed information about them.' by /u/dessymd removed from /r/belgium within 0-10min

'''
Hi, I have one question about gti net. It's look like ponzi scheme. how you are sure that this forex trading is real?
Do you have some legal agreement with the company? Because I can't find detailed information about them.
'''
Context Link
Go1dfish undelete link
unreddit undelete link
Author: dessymd
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

Puts on SLV and GLD

Recently Goldman came out with info that they are betting against the dollar in anticipation of a blue wave win. In this case that would be the DXY index.
CNBC Article: https://www.cnbc.com/2020/10/12/goldman-sachs-bets-against-the-dollar-on-blue-wave-prospects-and-vaccine-outlook.html
Here's the thing. Unless you're mind numbingly autistic, you know that the #1 firm in the world didn't decide to go short AFTER a 10% decline in value.
They need liquidity. They need forex plebs to short the dollar and fill their positions before they ramp DXY into the elecshun.
No I know what tards are thinking, "Why DXY up when money brinter go brrr?"
Here's the thing, during WWII the allied nations agreed on the Bretton Woods agreement which basically cemented the US dollar as the world's reserve currency. Meaning that was the currency to be bought during global economic uncertainty. (Google it)
Now retards like Robert Kiyosaki or Peter Schiff will tell you that's over. That's not the case, take a look at the DXY pump during the March crash. They just want you to buy their books.
The point is that DXY is going to pump into this alleged "blue wave" to protect the uncertainty behind the event.
The pump we have seen in metals like gold and silver are directly related to DXY. This is because gold and silver's only purpose is a hedge against inflation. Yes silver can be used for solar and jewelery blah blah idgaf I'm here for tendies not cope.
But as far as prices trending upwards, for inflationary hedged assets, this can only happen with the weakening of the dollar.
BUT THIS IS WHERE IT GETS FUCKED
You would think that with all the central bank printing inflation would be through the roof. But 3 weeks ago you saw JPOW struggle to answer how the FED will reach it's 2% inflation target. Today the bank of korea came out and stated inflation will remain low this year.
There are too many things in line for metals not to pump into the end of the year. Long term (mid 2021-2022) I think it's very possible to see actual inflation and see Gold climb to 2300 and Silver around 35.
But in the meantime I think these metals are in for a rocky end to 2020.
POSITIONS:
01/15/21 SLV 20P
01/15/21 GLD 185P
Tl;dr Goldman liars. Money printer brrr no work with elecshun. GLD / SLV down soon.
submitted by RothStonk to wallstreetbets [link] [comments]

RBI & how its policies can start to affect the market

Disclaimer: This DD is to help start forming a market view as per RBI announcements. Also a gentle reminder that fundamentals play out over a longer time frame than intraday. The authors take no responsiblity for your yolos.
With contributions by Asli Bakchodi, Bran OP & dragononweed!

What is the RBI?
RBI is the central bank of India. They are one of the key players who affect India’s economic trajectory. They control currency supply, banking rules and more. This means that it is not a bank in which retailers or corporates can open an account with. Instead they are a bank for bankers and the Government of India.
Their functions can be broadly classified into 6.
· Monetary authority
· Financial supervisor for financial system
· Issuer of currency
· Manages Foreign exchange
· Bankers bank
· Banker to the government
This DD will take a look at each of these functions. It will be followed by a list of rates the RBI sets, and how changes in them can affect the market.
1. Monetary Authority
One of RBI’s functions is to achieve the goal of “Price Stability” in the economy. This essentially means achieving an inflation rate that is within a desired limit.
A monetary policy committee (MPC) decides on the desired inflation rate and its limits through majority vote of its 6 members, in consultation with the GoI.
The current inflation target for RBI is as follows
Consumer Price Inflation (CPI): 4%
Upper Limit: 6%
Lower Limit: 2%
An increase in CPI means less purchasing power. Generally speaking, if inflation is too high, the public starts cutting down on spending, leading to a negative impact on the markets. And vice versa. Lower inflation leads to more purchasing power, more spending, more investments leading to a positive impact on the market.
2. Financial Supervisor For Financial System
A financial system consists of financial markets (Capital market, money market, forex market etc.), financial institutions (banks, stock exchanges, NBFC etc) & financial assets (currencies, bills, bonds etc)
RBI supervises this entire system and lays down the rules and regulations for it. It can also use further ‘Selective Credit Controls’ to regulate banks.
3. Issues of currency
The RBI is responsible for the printing of currency notes. RBI is free to print as much as it wants as long as the minimum reserve of Rs 200 Cr (Gold 112 Cr) is maintained. The RBI has total assets or a balance size sheet of Rs. 51 trillion (April 2020). (1 Trillion = 1 Lakh crore)
India’s current reserves mean our increase in currency circulation is well managed.
4. Manages Foreign Exchange
RBI regulates all of India’s foreign exchange transactions. It is the custodian of all of foreign currencies in India. It allows for the foreign exchange value of the rupee to be controlled. RBI also buy and sell rupees in the foreign exchange market at its discretion.
In case of any currency movement, a country’s central bank can directly intervene to either push the currency up, as India has been doing, or to keep it artificially low, as the Chinese central bank does. To push up a currency, a central bank can sell dollars, which is the global reserve currency, or the currency against which all others are measured. To push down a currency, a central bank can buy dollars.
The RBI deciding this depends on the import/export and financial health of the country. Generally a weaker rupee means imports are more expensive, but are favourable for exports. And a stronger rupee means imports are cheaper but are unfavourable for exports.
A weaker rupee can make foreign investment more lucrative driving up FII. A stronger rupee can have an adverse effect of FII investing in markets.
5. Banker’s Bank
Every bank has to maintain a certain amount of reserve with the RBI. A certain percentage of a bank’s liabilities (anywhere between 3-15% as decided by RBI) has to be maintained in this account. This is called the Cash Reserve Ratio. This is determined by the MPC during the monetary policy review (which happens every six weeks at present).
It lends money from this reserve to other banks if they are short on cash, but generally, it is seen as a last resort move. Banks are encouraged to meet their shortfalls of cash from other resources.
6. Banker to the government
RBI is the entity that carries out ALL monetary transactions on behalf of the Government. It holds custody of the cash balance of the Government, gives temporary loans to both central and state governments and manages the debt operations of the central Government, through instruments of debt and the interest rates associated with them - like bonds.
The different rates set & managed by RBI
- Repo rate
The rate at which RBI is willing to lend to commercial banks is called as Repo Rate.
Banks sometimes need money for emergency or to maintain the SLR and CRR (explained below). They borrow this from RBI but have to pay some interest on it. The interest that is to be paid on the amount to the RBI is called as Repo Rate.
It does not function like a normal loan but acts like a forward contract. Banks have to provide collateral like government bonds, T-bills etc. Repo means Repurchase Option is the true meaning of Repo an agreement where the bank promises to repurchase these government securities after the repo period is over.
As a tool to control inflation, RBI increases the Repo Rate making it more expensive for banks to borrow from the RBI with a view to restrict availability of money. Exact opposite stance shall be taken in case of deflationary environment.
The change of repo rate is aimed to affect the flow of money in the economy. An increase in repo rate decreases the flow of money in the economy, while the decrease in repo rate increases the flow of money in the economy. RBI by changing these rates shows its stance to the economy at large whether they prioritize growth or inflation.
- Reverse Repo Rate
The rate at which the RBI is willing to borrow from the Banks is called as Reverse Repo Rate. If the RBI increases the reverse repo rate, it means that the RBI is willing to offer lucrative interest rate to banks to park their money with the RBI. Banks in this case agree to resell government securities after reverse repo period.
Generally, an increase in reverse repo rate that banks will have a higher incentive to park their money with RBI. It decreases liquidity, affecting the market in a negative manner. Decrease in reverse repo rate increases liquidity affecting the market in a positive manner.
Both the repo rate and reverse repo rate fall under the Liquidity Adjustment Facility tools for RBI.
- Cash reserve ratio (CRR)
Banks in India are required to deposit a specific percentage of their net demand and time liabilities (NDTL) in the form of CASH with the RBI. This minimum ratio (that is the part of the total deposits to be held as cash) is stipulated by the RBI and is known as the CRR or Cash Reserve Ratio. These reserves will not be in circulation at any point in time.
For example, if a bank had a NDTL (like current Account, Savings Account and Fixed Deposits) of 100Cr and the CRR is at 3%, it would have to keep 3Cr as Cash reserve ratio to the RBI. This amount earns no interest.
Currently it is at 3%. A lower cash ratio means banks can deposit just a lower amount and use the remaining money leading to higher liquidity. This translates to more money to invest which is seen as positive for the market. Inversely, a higher cash ratio equates to lower liquidity which translates to a negative market sentiment.
Thus, the RBI uses the CRR to control excess money flow and regulate liquidity in the economy.
- Statutory liquidity ratio (SLR)
Banks in India have to keep a certain percentage of their net demand and time liabilities WITH THEMSELVES. And this can be in the form of liquid assets like gold and government securities, not just cash. A lot of banks keep them in government bonds as they give a decent interest.
The current SLR ratio of 18.25%, which means that for every Rs.100 deposited in a bank, it has to invest Rs.18.50 in any of the asset classes approved by RBI.
A low SLR means higher levels of loans to the private sector. This boosts investment and acts as a positive sentiment for the market. Conversely a high SLR means tighter levels of credit and can cause a negative effect on the market.
Essentially, the RBI uses the SLR to control ease of credit in the economy. It also ensures that the banks maintain a certain level of funds to meet depositor’s demands instead of over liquidation.
- Bank Rate
Bank rate is a rate at which the Reserve Bank of India provides the loan to commercial banks without keeping any security. There is no agreement on repurchase that will be drawn up or agreed upon with no collateral as well. This is different from repo rate as loans taken with repo rate are taken on the basis of securities. Bank rate hence is higher than the repo rate.
Currently the bank rate is 4.25%. Since bank rate is essentially a loan interest rate like repo rate, it affects the market in similar ways.
- Marginal Cost of Funds based Lending Rate (MCLR)
This is the minimum rate below which the banks are not allowed to lend. Raising this rate, makes loans more expensive, drying up liquidity, affecting the market in a negative way. Similarly, lower MCLR rates will bring in high liquidity, affecting the market in a positive way.
MCLR is a varying lending rate instead of a single rate according to the kind of loans. Currently, the MCLR rate is between 6.65% - 7.15%
- Marginal Standing facility
Marginal Standing Facility is the interest rate at which a depository institution (generally banks) lends or borrows funds with another depository institution in the overnight market. Overnight market is the part of financial market which offers the shortest term loans. These loans have to be repaid the next day.
MSF can be used by a bank after it exhausts its eligible security holdings for borrowing under other options like the Liquidity adjustment facilities.
The MSF would be a penal rate for banks and the banks can borrow funds by pledging government securities within the limits of the statutory liquidity ratio.
The current rate stands at 4.25%. The effect it has on the market is synonymous with the other lending rates such as repo rate & bank rate.
- Loan to value ratio
The loan-to-value (LTV) ratio is an assessment of lending risk that financial institutions and other lenders examine before approving a mortgage. Typically, loan assessments with high LTV ratios are considered higher risk loans.
Basically, if a companies preferred form of collateral rises in value and leads the market (growing faster than the market), then the company will see the loans that it signed with higher LTV suddenly reduce (but the interest rate remains the same).
Let’s consider an example of gold as a collateral. Consider a loan was approved with gold as collateral. The market price for gold is Rs 2000/g, and for each g, a loan of Rs 1500 was given. (The numbers are simplified for understanding). This would put LTV of the loan at 1500/2000 = 0.75. Since it is a substantial LTV, say the company priced the loan at 20% interest rate.
Now the next year, the price of gold rose to Rs 3000/kg. This would mean that the LTV of the current loan has changed to 0.5 but the company is not obligated to change the interest rate. This means that even if the company sees a lot of defaults, it is fairly protected by the unexpected surge in the underlying asset. Moreover, since the underlying asset is more valuable, default rates for the loans goes down as people are more protective of the collateral they have placed.
The same scenario for gold is happening right now and is the reason for gold backed loan providers like MUTHOOT to hit ATHs as gold is leading the economy right now. Also, these in these scenarios, it also enables companies to offer additional loan on same gold for those who are interested Instead of keeping the loan amount same most of the gold loan companies.
Based on above, we can see that as RBI changes LTV for certain assets, we are in a position to identify potential institutions that could get a good Quarterly result and try to enter it early.
Conclusion
The above rates contain the ways in the Central Bank manages the monetary policy, growth and inflation in the country.
Its impact on Stock market is often seen when these rates are changed, they act as triggers for the intraday positions on that day. But overall, the outlook is always maintained on how the RBI sees the country is doing, and knee jerk reactions are limited to intraday positions. The long term stance is always well within the limits of the outlook the big players in the market are expecting.
The important thing to keep in mind is that the problems facing the economy needn’t be uni-dimensional. Problems with inflation, growth, liquidity, currency depreciation all can come together, for which the RBI will have to play a balancing role with all it powers to change these rates and the forex reserve. So the effect on the market needs to be given more thought than simply extrapolated as ‘rates go low, markets go up’.
But understanding these individual effects of these rates allows you to start putting together the puzzle of how and where the market and the economy could go.
submitted by crackedminds333 to IndianStreetBets [link] [comments]

Trading Educators. If you're new how you should see them & why their students defend them even if they're not profitable

As the smart people in trading communities know; Most educators are frauds there's always a narrative that they're experts in the business but they're never track records (third party verified) or live trading statements to back it up.
There whole model is to create conflict of interests with the trader to shill courses, services and '70% accurate signals' and even recommend brokers for commission using Introducing Broker agreements or Affiliate links.
If you're new to trading regardless of the asset class i'd view whoever wants to teach you whether you pay for it or not as a business teacher; They have no success in business (The Majority) But they're legally able to teach the theory regarding business...

Why people back gurus up:
#1 They feel like they're in an elite community lead by success; sadly newbies are often mislead
#2 They buy courses/services and they feel like they have learn't something such as basic risk management, price action, support and resistance etc, wyckoff theory, all which can be found online.
#3 When their victims fail they often blame themeselves because so many of their students back their favourite traders no matter the scrutinity/evidence.
#4 Their students sign NDAs with the Trader before getting access to Trading groups & Materials so if they discuss anything or they will get punished (Inner Circle Trader ICT) Is a fake forex trader who does this practice.
#5 The person defends the guru for not selling anything although he has affiliate links, promotes people or something else such as brokers or prop firms...

Example of a poor brainwashed forex trader:
I watch raja lives (Wicksdontlie)
If uncle ted is there n dropping knowledge I soak it up
U literally can’t say rajas faking it bc it’s all there the trades he takes what he loves off of
Anything can be faked especially in the forex industry just look at my recent posts on daytrading or forex and you'll see.

Don't fall for these 'Educators' who need you to buy there courses for 100s to thousands of dollars and sell signals for a subscriptions if you do the numbers you'll find out for yourself their incentive:
YT channel 40000 subscribers sells a $500 course assuming 2% of his audience buys his course 800 people that's 800*500 that's $400000 easily made and completely passive many offer additional services such as signals and more for a fixed subscription ex. $25 a month if 2% of his audience subscribes to it that's 800*25 that's s cool $20000 a month and yes they may get less than a 2% conversion rate but 2-3% is average and even if 1% participate that person makes alot of money very easily...
submitted by HelpfulTear to Daytrading [link] [comments]

[Business] - Japan says it's committed to G20 agreement on forex policy | REUTERS

[Business] - Japan says it's committed to G20 agreement on forex policy | REUTERS submitted by AutoNewspaperAdmin to AutoNewspaper [link] [comments]

[Business] - Japan says it's committed to G20 agreement on forex policy

[Business] - Japan says it's committed to G20 agreement on forex policy submitted by AutoNewsAdmin to REUTERSauto [link] [comments]

Japan says it's committed to G20 agreement on forex policy

Japan says it's committed to G20 agreement on forex policy submitted by ocamlmycaml to EconNews [link] [comments]

Trading Educators. If you're new how you should see them & why their students defend them even if they're not profitable

As the smart people in trading communities know; Most educators are frauds there's always a narrative that they're experts in the business but they're never track records (third party verified) or live trading statements to back it up.
There whole model is to create conflict of interests with the trader to shill courses, services and '70% accurate signals' and even recommend brokers for commission using Introducing Broker agreements or Affiliate links.
If you're new to trading regardless of the asset class i'd view whoever wants to teach you whether you pay for it or not as a business teacher; They have no success in business (The Majority) But they're legally able to teach the theory regarding business...

Why people back gurus up:
#1 They feel like they're in an elite community lead by success; sadly newbies are often mislead
#2 They buy courses/services and they feel like they have learn't something such as basic risk management, price action, support and resistance etc, wyckoff theory, all which can be found online.
#3 When their victims fail they often blame themeselves because so many of their students back their favourite traders no matter the scrutinity/evidence.
#4 Their students sign NDAs (Non Disclosure Agreements) with the Trader before getting access to Trading groups & Materials so if they discuss anything or they will get punished (Inner Circle Trader ICT) Is a fake forex trader who does this practice.
#5 The person defends the guru for not selling anything although he has affiliate links, promotes people or something else such as brokers or prop firms...

Example of a poor brainwashed forex trader:
I watch raja lives (Wicksdontlie)
If uncle ted is there n dropping knowledge I soak it up
U literally can’t say rajas faking it bc it’s all there the trades he takes what he loves off of
Anything can be faked especially in the forex industry just look at my recent posts on daytrading or forex and you'll see.

Don't fall for these 'Educators' who need you to buy there courses for 100s to thousands of dollars and sell signals for a subscriptions if you do the numbers you'll find out for yourself their incentive:
YT channel 40000 subscribers sells a $500 course assuming 2% of his audience buys his course 800 people that's 800*500 that's $400000 easily made and completely passive many offer additional services such as signals and more for a fixed subscription ex. $25 a month if 2% of his audience subscribes to it that's 800*25 that's s cool $20000 a month and yes they may get less than a 2% conversion rate but 2-3% is average and even if 1% participate that person makes a lot of money very easily...
submitted by HelpfulTear to Forex [link] [comments]

Dollar is set back by euphoria. Forecast as of 09.11.2020

Dollar is set back by euphoria. Forecast as of 09.11.2020
Investors continue trading the idea of Joe Biden becoming the president. That is why the S&P 500 features the best weekly rise since April and pushes the EURUSD up. How long will it continue? Let us discuss the Forex outlook and make up a EURUSD trading plan.

Weekly US dollar fundamental analysis

Euphoria rules the market. Investors forgot about both COVID-19, the US fiscal stimulus's unsettled issue, and Donald Trump rejecting the voting results. Traders are satisfied with the less uncertainty around Joe Biden’s policy, hoping for lower volatility. Analysts suggest that the divided Congress won’t allow Biden to carry out radical reforms in tightening taxation and regulation of technology companies. As a result, the S&P 500 grew by 7.3% in the first week of November, and the USD dropped to the lowest level since early September.
How long will the euphoria last? History proves that starting from 2000, if the S&P 500 was growing on election day, it continued growing in November and December. The first years of presidential terms were also favorable for the US stock indexes. The S&P 500 grew by 18.6% on average. However, the stock indexes’ trends during the time of the divided Congress, which prevented the White House from carrying out radical reforms, were controversial. During 45 years, starting from 1928, when one party controlled the US government, the stock market rose at an average rate of 7.46% annually, up from 7.26% in 46 years when the power was divided.

Reaction of S&P 500 to the political situation in USA


Source: Wall Street Journal
In my opinion, the markets are going too fast. Investors want to join the stock market’s uptrend, forgetting about the negative. However, are some negative factors that should have their effect. First, political uncertainty continues. Donald Trump is challenging the election results. Because of the second round of voting in Georgia, we will know the partisan makeup of the U.S. Senate only on January 5. It creates obstacles to the agreement on the new fiscal stimulus. Until a fresh stimulus is provided, the US economy will be slowing down, which presses down both the global GDP and the risk appetite.
Second, the coronavirus vaccines haven’t yet been developed, and the COVID-19 pandemic continues in the USA and in the euro area. The numbers of new coronavirus cases, hospitalizations, and deaths are hitting all-time highs, so investors’ optimism is surprising. The epidemiological situation in Europe is deteriorating. France, Germany, and other countries are locked down. This fact suggests that the divergence in the economic growth and monetary policy is in favor of the EURUSD bears.
Finally, the U.S. dollar may not be falling amid the growth of the S&P 500. The negative correlation between stocks and the USD is the strongest at the time of uncertainty, also because of the US presidential election. Once uncertainty eases, the negative correlation should stop working.

Weekly EURUSD trading plan

Euphoria rules the market, but it can’t last for long. If the EURUSD bulls fail to hold the price above 1.188, the pair should roll down to 1.183 and 1.1785. Otherwise, if the resistance is held up, the euro could continue the rally up to $1.195-$1.196 and even $1.2. Next, large traders should take some profits and exit the longs.
For more information follow the link to the website of the LiteForex
https://www.liteforex.com/blog/analysts-opinions/dollar-is-set-back-by-euphoria-forecast-as-of-09112020/?uid=285861726&cid=62423

submitted by Maxvelgus to Finance_analytics [link] [comments]

Everything You Always Wanted To Know About Swaps* (*But Were Afraid To Ask)

Hello, dummies
It's your old pal, Fuzzy.
As I'm sure you've all noticed, a lot of the stuff that gets posted here is - to put it delicately - fucking ridiculous. More backwards-ass shit gets posted to wallstreetbets than you'd see on a Westboro Baptist community message board. I mean, I had a look at the daily thread yesterday and..... yeesh. I know, I know. We all make like the divine Laura Dern circa 1992 on the daily and stick our hands deep into this steaming heap of shit to find the nuggets of valuable and/or hilarious information within (thanks for reading, BTW). I agree. I love it just the way it is too. That's what makes WSB great.
What I'm getting at is that a lot of the stuff that gets posted here - notwithstanding it being funny or interesting - is just... wrong. Like, fucking your cousin wrong. And to be clear, I mean the fucking your *first* cousin kinda wrong, before my Southerners in the back get all het up (simmer down, Billy Ray - I know Mabel's twice removed on your grand-sister's side). Truly, I try to let it slide. I do my bit to try and put you on the right path. Most of the time, I sleep easy no matter how badly I've seen someone explain what a bank liquidity crisis is. But out of all of those tens of thousands of misguided, autistic attempts at understanding the world of high finance, one thing gets so consistently - so *emphatically* - fucked up and misunderstood by you retards that last night I felt obligated at the end of a long work day to pull together this edition of Finance with Fuzzy just for you. It's so serious I'm not even going to make a u/pokimane gag. Have you guessed what it is yet? Here's a clue. It's in the title of the post.
That's right, friends. Today in the neighborhood we're going to talk all about hedging in financial markets - spots, swaps, collars, forwards, CDS, synthetic CDOs, all that fun shit. Don't worry; I'm going to explain what all the scary words mean and how they impact your OTM RH positions along the way.
We're going to break it down like this. (1) "What's a hedge, Fuzzy?" (2) Common Hedging Strategies and (3) All About ISDAs and Credit Default Swaps.
Before we begin. For the nerds and JV traders in the back (and anyone else who needs to hear this up front) - I am simplifying these descriptions for the purposes of this post. I am also obviously not going to try and cover every exotic form of hedge under the sun or give a detailed summation of what caused the financial crisis. If you are interested in something specific ask a question, but don't try and impress me with your Investopedia skills or technical points I didn't cover; I will just be forced to flex my years of IRL experience on you in the comments and you'll look like a big dummy.
TL;DR? Fuck you. There is no TL;DR. You've come this far already. What's a few more paragraphs? Put down the Cheetos and try to concentrate for the next 5-7 minutes. You'll learn something, and I promise I'll be gentle.
Ready? Let's get started.
1. The Tao of Risk: Hedging as a Way of Life
The simplest way to characterize what a hedge 'is' is to imagine every action having a binary outcome. One is bad, one is good. Red lines, green lines; uppie, downie. With me so far? Good. A 'hedge' is simply the employment of a strategy to mitigate the effect of your action having the wrong binary outcome. You wanted X, but you got Z! Frowny face. A hedge strategy introduces a third outcome. If you hedged against the possibility of Z happening, then you can wind up with Y instead. Not as good as X, but not as bad as Z. The technical definition I like to give my idiot juniors is as follows:
Utilization of a defensive strategy to mitigate risk, at a fraction of the cost to capital of the risk itself.
Congratulations. You just finished Hedging 101. "But Fuzzy, that's easy! I just sold a naked call against my 95% OTM put! I'm adequately hedged!". Spoiler alert: you're not (although good work on executing a collar, which I describe below). What I'm talking about here is what would be referred to as a 'perfect hedge'; a binary outcome where downside is totally mitigated by a risk management strategy. That's not how it works IRL. Pay attention; this is the tricky part.
You can't take a single position and conclude that you're adequately hedged because risks are fluid, not static. So you need to constantly adjust your position in order to maximize the value of the hedge and insure your position. You also need to consider exposure to more than one category of risk. There are micro (specific exposure) risks, and macro (trend exposure) risks, and both need to factor into the hedge calculus.
That's why, in the real world, the value of hedging depends entirely on the design of the hedging strategy itself. Here, when we say "value" of the hedge, we're not talking about cash money - we're talking about the intrinsic value of the hedge relative to the the risk profile of your underlying exposure. To achieve this, people hedge dynamically. In wallstreetbets terms, this means that as the value of your position changes, you need to change your hedges too. The idea is to efficiently and continuously distribute and rebalance risk across different states and periods, taking value from states in which the marginal cost of the hedge is low and putting it back into states where marginal cost of the hedge is high, until the shadow value of your underlying exposure is equalized across your positions. The punchline, I guess, is that one static position is a hedge in the same way that the finger paintings you make for your wife's boyfriend are art - it's technically correct, but you're only playing yourself by believing it.
Anyway. Obviously doing this as a small potatoes trader is hard but it's worth taking into account. Enough basic shit. So how does this work in markets?
2. A Hedging Taxonomy
The best place to start here is a practical question. What does a business need to hedge against? Think about the specific risk that an individual business faces. These are legion, so I'm just going to list a few of the key ones that apply to most corporates. (1) You have commodity risk for the shit you buy or the shit you use. (2) You have currency risk for the money you borrow. (3) You have rate risk on the debt you carry. (4) You have offtake risk for the shit you sell. Complicated, right? To help address the many and varied ways that shit can go wrong in a sophisticated market, smart operators like yours truly have devised a whole bundle of different instruments which can help you manage the risk. I might write about some of the more complicated ones in a later post if people are interested (CDO/CLOs, strip/stack hedges and bond swaps with option toggles come to mind) but let's stick to the basics for now.
(i) Swaps
A swap is one of the most common forms of hedge instrument, and they're used by pretty much everyone that can afford them. The language is complicated but the concept isn't, so pay attention and you'll be fine. This is the most important part of this section so it'll be the longest one.
Swaps are derivative contracts with two counterparties (before you ask, you can't trade 'em on an exchange - they're OTC instruments only). They're used to exchange one cash flow for another cash flow of equal expected value; doing this allows you to take speculative positions on certain financial prices or to alter the cash flows of existing assets or liabilities within a business. "Wait, Fuzz; slow down! What do you mean sets of cash flows?". Fear not, little autist. Ol' Fuzz has you covered.
The cash flows I'm talking about are referred to in swap-land as 'legs'. One leg is fixed - a set payment that's the same every time it gets paid - and the other is variable - it fluctuates (typically indexed off the price of the underlying risk that you are speculating on / protecting against). You set it up at the start so that they're notionally equal and the two legs net off; so at open, the swap is a zero NPV instrument. Here's where the fun starts. If the price that you based the variable leg of the swap on changes, the value of the swap will shift; the party on the wrong side of the move ponies up via the variable payment. It's a zero sum game.
I'll give you an example using the most vanilla swap around; an interest rate trade. Here's how it works. You borrow money from a bank, and they charge you a rate of interest. You lock the rate up front, because you're smart like that. But then - quelle surprise! - the rate gets better after you borrow. Now you're bagholding to the tune of, I don't know, 5 bps. Doesn't sound like much but on a billion dollar loan that's a lot of money (a classic example of the kind of 'small, deep hole' that's terrible for profits). Now, if you had a swap contract on the rate before you entered the trade, you're set; if the rate goes down, you get a payment under the swap. If it goes up, whatever payment you're making to the bank is netted off by the fact that you're borrowing at a sub-market rate. Win-win! Or, at least, Lose Less / Lose Less. That's the name of the game in hedging.
There are many different kinds of swaps, some of which are pretty exotic; but they're all different variations on the same theme. If your business has exposure to something which fluctuates in price, you trade swaps to hedge against the fluctuation. The valuation of swaps is also super interesting but I guarantee you that 99% of you won't understand it so I'm not going to try and explain it here although I encourage you to google it if you're interested.
Because they're OTC, none of them are filed publicly. Someeeeeetimes you see an ISDA (dsicussed below) but the confirms themselves (the individual swaps) are not filed. You can usually read about the hedging strategy in a 10-K, though. For what it's worth, most modern credit agreements ban speculative hedging. Top tip: This is occasionally something worth checking in credit agreements when you invest in businesses that are debt issuers - being able to do this increases the risk profile significantly and is particularly important in times of economic volatility (ctrl+f "non-speculative" in the credit agreement to be sure).
(ii) Forwards
A forward is a contract made today for the future delivery of an asset at a pre-agreed price. That's it. "But Fuzzy! That sounds just like a futures contract!". I know. Confusing, right? Just like a futures trade, forwards are generally used in commodity or forex land to protect against price fluctuations. The differences between forwards and futures are small but significant. I'm not going to go into super boring detail because I don't think many of you are commodities traders but it is still an important thing to understand even if you're just an RH jockey, so stick with me.
Just like swaps, forwards are OTC contracts - they're not publicly traded. This is distinct from futures, which are traded on exchanges (see The Ballad Of Big Dick Vick for some more color on this). In a forward, no money changes hands until the maturity date of the contract when delivery and receipt are carried out; price and quantity are locked in from day 1. As you now know having read about BDV, futures are marked to market daily, and normally people close them out with synthetic settlement using an inverse position. They're also liquid, and that makes them easier to unwind or close out in case shit goes sideways.
People use forwards when they absolutely have to get rid of the thing they made (or take delivery of the thing they need). If you're a miner, or a farmer, you use this shit to make sure that at the end of the production cycle, you can get rid of the shit you made (and you won't get fucked by someone taking cash settlement over delivery). If you're a buyer, you use them to guarantee that you'll get whatever the shit is that you'll need at a price agreed in advance. Because they're OTC, you can also exactly tailor them to the requirements of your particular circumstances.
These contracts are incredibly byzantine (and there are even crazier synthetic forwards you can see in money markets for the true degenerate fund managers). In my experience, only Texan oilfield magnates, commodities traders, and the weirdo forex crowd fuck with them. I (i) do not own a 10 gallon hat or a novelty size belt buckle (ii) do not wake up in the middle of the night freaking out about the price of pork fat and (iii) love greenbacks too much to care about other countries' monopoly money, so I don't fuck with them.
(iii) Collars
No, not the kind your wife is encouraging you to wear try out to 'spice things up' in the bedroom during quarantine. Collars are actually the hedging strategy most applicable to WSB. Collars deal with options! Hooray!
To execute a basic collar (also called a wrapper by tea-drinking Brits and people from the Antipodes), you buy an out of the money put while simultaneously writing a covered call on the same equity. The put protects your position against price drops and writing the call produces income that offsets the put premium. Doing this limits your tendies (you can only profit up to the strike price of the call) but also writes down your risk. If you screen large volume trades with a VOL/OI of more than 3 or 4x (and they're not bullshit biotech stocks), you can sometimes see these being constructed in real time as hedge funds protect themselves on their shorts.
(3) All About ISDAs, CDS and Synthetic CDOs
You may have heard about the mythical ISDA. Much like an indenture (discussed in my post on $F), it's a magic legal machine that lets you build swaps via trade confirms with a willing counterparty. They are very complicated legal documents and you need to be a true expert to fuck with them. Fortunately, I am, so I do. They're made of two parts; a Master (which is a form agreement that's always the same) and a Schedule (which amends the Master to include your specific terms). They are also the engine behind just about every major credit crunch of the last 10+ years.
First - a brief explainer. An ISDA is a not in and of itself a hedge - it's an umbrella contract that governs the terms of your swaps, which you use to construct your hedge position. You can trade commodities, forex, rates, whatever, all under the same ISDA.
Let me explain. Remember when we talked about swaps? Right. So. You can trade swaps on just about anything. In the late 90s and early 2000s, people had the smart idea of using other people's debt and or credit ratings as the variable leg of swap documentation. These are called credit default swaps. I was actually starting out at a bank during this time and, I gotta tell you, the only thing I can compare people's enthusiasm for this shit to was that moment in your early teens when you discover jerking off. Except, unlike your bathroom bound shame sessions to Mom's Sears catalogue, every single person you know felt that way too; and they're all doing it at once. It was a fiscal circlejerk of epic proportions, and the financial crisis was the inevitable bukkake finish. WSB autism is absolutely no comparison for the enthusiasm people had during this time for lighting each other's money on fire.
Here's how it works. You pick a company. Any company. Maybe even your own! And then you write a swap. In the swap, you define "Credit Event" with respect to that company's debt as the variable leg . And you write in... whatever you want. A ratings downgrade, default under the docs, failure to meet a leverage ratio or FCCR for a certain testing period... whatever. Now, this started out as a hedge position, just like we discussed above. The purest of intentions, of course. But then people realized - if bad shit happens, you make money. And banks... don't like calling in loans or forcing bankruptcies. Can you smell what the moral hazard is cooking?
Enter synthetic CDOs. CDOs are basically pools of asset backed securities that invest in debt (loans or bonds). They've been around for a minute but they got famous in the 2000s because a shitload of them containing subprime mortgage debt went belly up in 2008. This got a lot of publicity because a lot of sad looking rednecks got foreclosed on and were interviewed on CNBC. "OH!", the people cried. "Look at those big bad bankers buying up subprime loans! They caused this!". Wrong answer, America. The debt wasn't the problem. What a lot of people don't realize is that the real meat of the problem was not in regular way CDOs investing in bundles of shit mortgage debts in synthetic CDOs investing in CDS predicated on that debt. They're synthetic because they don't have a stake in the actual underlying debt; just the instruments riding on the coattails. The reason these are so popular (and remain so) is that smart structured attorneys and bankers like your faithful correspondent realized that an even more profitable and efficient way of building high yield products with limited downside was investing in instruments that profit from failure of debt and in instruments that rely on that debt and then hedging that exposure with other CDS instruments in paired trades, and on and on up the chain. The problem with doing this was that everyone wound up exposed to everybody else's books as a result, and when one went tits up, everybody did. Hence, recession, Basel III, etc. Thanks, Obama.
Heavy investment in CDS can also have a warping effect on the price of debt (something else that happened during the pre-financial crisis years and is starting to happen again now). This happens in three different ways. (1) Investors who previously were long on the debt hedge their position by selling CDS protection on the underlying, putting downward pressure on the debt price. (2) Investors who previously shorted the debt switch to buying CDS protection because the relatively illiquid debt (partic. when its a bond) trades at a discount below par compared to the CDS. The resulting reduction in short selling puts upward pressure on the bond price. (3) The delta in price and actual value of the debt tempts some investors to become NBTs (neg basis traders) who long the debt and purchase CDS protection. If traders can't take leverage, nothing happens to the price of the debt. If basis traders can take leverage (which is nearly always the case because they're holding a hedged position), they can push up or depress the debt price, goosing swap premiums etc. Anyway. Enough technical details.
I could keep going. This is a fascinating topic that is very poorly understood and explained, mainly because the people that caused it all still work on the street and use the same tactics today (it's also terribly taught at business schools because none of the teachers were actually around to see how this played out live). But it relates to the topic of today's lesson, so I thought I'd include it here.
Work depending, I'll be back next week with a covenant breakdown. Most upvoted ticker gets the post.
*EDIT 1\* In a total blowout, $PLAY won. So it's D&B time next week. Post will drop Monday at market open.
submitted by fuzzyblankeet to wallstreetbets [link] [comments]

Your Pre Market Brief for 07/16/2020

Pre Market Brief for Thursday July 16th 2020

You can subscribe to the daily 4:00 AM Pre Market Brief on The Twitter Link Here . Alerts in the tweets will direct you to the daily 4:00 AM Pre Market Brief in this sub.
Updated as of 4:45 AM EST
-----------------------------------------------
Stock Futures:
Wednesday 07/15/2020 News and Markets Recap:
Thursday July 16th 2020 Economic Calendar (All times are in EST)
(JOBLESS CLAIMS TODAY)
News Heading into Thursday July 16th 2020:
NOTE: I USUALLY (TRY TO) POST MANY OF THE MOST PROMISING, DRAMATIC, OR BAD NEWS OVERNIGHT STORIES THAT ARE LIKELY IMPORTANT TO THE MEMBERS OF THIS SUB AT THE TOP OF THIS LIST. PLEASE DO NOT YOLO THE VARIOUS TICKERS WITHOUT DOING RESEARCH! THE TIME STAMPS ON THESE MAY BE LATER THAN OTHERS ON THE WEB.
Upcoming Earnings:
Commodities:
COVID-19 Stats and News:
Macro Considerations:
Most Recent SEC Filings
Other
-----------------------------------------------
Morning Research and Trading Prep Tool Kit
Other Useful Resources:
The Ultimate Quick Resource For the Amateur Trader.
Subscribe to This Brief and the daily 4:00 AM Pre Market Brief on The Twitter Link Here . Alerts in the tweets will direct you to the daily brief in this sub
submitted by Cicero1982 to pennystocks [link] [comments]

Euro: slow start and fast drive. Analysis as of 27.10.2020

Euro: slow start and fast drive. Analysis as of 27.10.2020

Weekly fundamental forecast for euro

There are a few reasons for the EURUSD’s drop to the bottom of figure 18: the US stock indexes’ fall amid loss of faith in fiscal stimuli and record-high growth of new cases in the USA; disappointing macrostatistics in Germany, and fears that the ECB may expand QE as early as in October. Investors were expecting the second wave of COVID-19, but they didn’t know it would come so fast. The record high growth of new cases in the USA, France, and Russia, the introduction of new restrictions, and emergency announcements in some European countries made the S&P 500 fall by 1.9%. The German DAX went further and dropped 3.7 %, drawing the euro down too.
The increase in new coronavirus cases in Germany provoked the Ifo’s Business Climate Index’s fall, the first in six months. It’s a bad signal about an eventual slump after a 6-month recovery. Growing risks of a double recession and reflation may urge the ECB to expand QE by €500 billion already on 29 October, in contrast to the Bloomberg experts’ bet on December. That will be an unpleasant surprise for EURUSD bulls.

German business climate index


Source: Bloomberg.

ECB bond-buying dynamics

Source: Bloomberg.
The States look preferable to the eurozone, which lost illusions about fast recovery. Three months ago, Bloomberg surveyed economists forecast that the US GDP would grow 18% in Q3. The estimate rose to 31.8% by the publication date against a backdrop of a large fiscal stimulus as a faster-than-expected removal of restrictions. If the fiscal stimulus isn’t extended, the US double recession chance will be as big as in Europe.
The market doesn’t believe in any extra support before the elections and has already started to doubt that the issue will be resolved after 3 November as a blue wave is becoming less likely. That results in the S&P 500’s fall, which contradicts history. Since 1928, the stock index has closed in the green zone in the week before the presidential election. If we take a Tuesday to Friday period, the indicator will increase by up to 91%. Thus, the week's bad start isn’t as bad a signal for the stock market and the euro.
Not only will Joe Biden’s victory inspire S&P 500 bulls, but it will also reduce the risk of a trade war resumption, the reason for which may be China’s slow execution of its obligations under January’s agreement. According to Bloomberg, China has bought $65.5 billion in US goods, while the agreement is $170 billion.

China’s fulfillment of trade obligations


Source: Bloomberg.
The Democrats’ victory will weaken the US protectionism and allow the global trade to breathe deeply. That’s good news for the export-oriented eurozone and its currency.

Weekly trading plan for EURUSD

S&P 500’s fall on 26 October should be interpreted as market noise. The story is likely to repeat itself, and the stock index will close in the green zone in the last week before the election.
The strategy for the EURUSD remains the same. Buy at a breakout of resistance at 1.1865.
For more information follow the link to the website of the LiteForex
https://www.liteforex.com/blog/analysts-opinions/euro-slow-start-and-fast-drive-analysis-as-of-27102020/?uid=285861726&cid=62423
submitted by Maxvelgus to Finance_analytics [link] [comments]

Random discussion thread for 12 December 2019

This is the random discussion thread for posts not directly related to Brunei or the subreddit. Talk about anything you want! Also, head on to our Discord's chat room to join in the fun!
Please respect reddiquette and be nice to one another.
This thread will remain stickied for two days until Friday.
Sort comments by "new" to get to fresh comments in the thread.
submitted by AutoModerator to Brunei [link] [comments]

Most economical way of paying off student loan from overseas.

I searched through this subreddit and was surprised to see this hasn't been discussed at much length (or I am bad at searching).
I am living overseas in Canada and am being charged 3.5% interest on my student loan balance so I'd like to now start paying it off ASAP.
From what I can see there are a number of possible methods for paying off a student loan from overseas:
I put together a quick table summarizing my options, calculated at 07:00 EDT - 9/8/20. Some things to note:
Method Fee Send Amount (CAD) Recieve Amount (NZD) Notes
TransferWise $8.79 $891.60 $1,000.00
Western Union $0.00 $908.30 $1,000.00
Orbit Remit $0.00 --- --- CAD Not Available
XE $0.00 ? $1,000.00 Website Down
OFX $0.00 $887.67 $1,000.00
Credit Card $0.00 $896.33 $1,000.00
Credit Card $12.72 $909.05 $1,000.00 IRD Convenience fee included (1.42%)​
Direct Debit $0.00 $904.10 $1,000.00
I have a few questions:
Thanks!
submitted by middayjester to PersonalFinanceNZ [link] [comments]

[Diplomacy] China-EU FTA

[Closed--as much as any trade negotiation with the EU can be]

The EU has slowly been extending its vast array of free trade agreements to cover much of the world, and, quite simply, China, as a member of our peaceful and prosperous rule-based international order, wants in.

This new FTA would massively expand the EUs zone of free trade, increasing it by nearly twenty trillion, as well as increasing our trade ties with the world by a roughly equivalent amount.

While we understand that developing this trade agreement will be a difficult and complex task, we have some thoughts on where to start:

European Concessions



Chinese Concessions


Joint Projects



These are really just a starting point, and we'd like to hear the EU's thoughts on this matter. Negotiating trade agreements with the EU is known to be difficult, but we think we may find it worthwhile.
submitted by AmericanNewt8 to Geosim [link] [comments]

Dollar follows the stock market. Forecast as of 12.10.2020

Dollar follows the stock market. Forecast as of 12.10.2020

Weekly US dollar fundamental forecast

The ECB attempts to weaken the euro fail. Philip Lane says the ECB already pursues an inflation strategy similar to the Fed. The European Central Bank is unwilling to tighten monetary policy until the inflation growth is reflected in the economic data. Nonetheless, the EURUSD doesn’t react to the ECB’s chief economist's speech and consolidates above figure 18 bottom. According to the HSBC, fiscal policy is currently the main factor in the financial markets, and central banks must admit that they have lost some power.
Although the United States has invested in its economy more money than most other countries in the world and significantly more than during the previous economic crisis, the fiscal stimulus tends to exhaust quickly. The euro-area governments continue to support small businesses and individuals, while the US policymakers can’t reach an agreement on its extension. The new $1.8 trillion stimulus plan offered by the Republicans is the largest in scale and contrasts with Donald Trump's recent announcement to end negotiations with Democrats. However, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi rejects it, calling the plan insufficient.

Sizes of fiscal stimulus

Source: Bloomberg
Some analysts suggested the new Republican proposal fueled the rally of the US stock indexes. The S&P 500 was 3.8% up in the week through October 9, having featured the best performance since July. I believe the US stock market is rising as the uncertainty around the US presidential election is lowering. Joe Biden’s chance to win is rising, and his victory shouldn't be such a disaster for the US stock indexes as expected earlier.
According to RealClearPolitics, the gap between Biden and Trump is 9.6 percentage points. For comparison, in 2016, Hillary Clinton was 5.8 pp ahead of Donald Trump three weeks before the vote. JP Morgan suggests the corporate tax hike in the case of Joe Biden's victory will temporarily hinder the US stock market. The higher tax rate will take effect on January 1, 2022, and the S&P 500 is likely to face a storm in the fourth quarter of 2021. However, as the experience of 1987 and 2013 shows, when taxes were also increased, the storm would not last long. After the correction, the bulls should resume the uptrend.

S&P 500 reaction to a corporate tax hike


Source: Bloomberg
I believe the US stock market trend is a significant driver for the EURUSD. Ahead of the US presidential election, the pair follows the US stock indexes, mostly ignoring the ECB verbal interventions, the second COVID-19 wave, and the euro-area economic data.

Weekly EURUSD trading plan

The US dollar is a more significant Forex currency than the euro, so the ECB willingness to weaken the euro alone is not enough to discourage the EURUSD bulls. Amid the growth of Joe Biden's approval rating, the EURUSD should continue rallying up to 1.1865-1.188. However, Donald Trump is not giving up yet, so one could sell on the price rise.
For more information follow the link to the website of the LiteForex
https://www.liteforex.com/blog/analysts-opinions/dollar-follows-the-stock-market-forecast-as-of-12102020/?uid=285861726&cid=62423
submitted by Maxvelgus to Finance_analytics [link] [comments]

Parents Stuck in a $33,000 Contract with Online Trading Academy (CANADA Situation)

CANADA
My parents joined Online Trading Academy which is an investment trading course based in Irving, California. They spent 33,000 CAD on the course that provides them with OTA's "Core Strategy" and "Professional Forex Trader" program along with their CliK software. They couldn't pay everything upfront so they had to finance the rest of the payment with OTA. I think this is a really bad idea and they did not consult anyone before making this decision.
OTA's refund policy is that they can provide anywhere from a partial to a full refund if my parents cancel within 3 calendar days after the initial payment that they made on the spot. In this situation, it's January 12 (I only found out about this a few days ago so it's too late to explore this option..).
I've read through the contract a couple of times and I don't see any cancellation options but I'm wondering if there's any way my parents can get out of this. PLEASE let me know if there's any way to get out of this bad mistake that will cost my parents 33,000 CAD.
Pictures of the contract: https://imgur.com/a/mbRPEjJ
UPDATE 1: I asked to get in touch with them 4 days ago and they've been saying they will let their upper management staff know every day since then. They processed the first monthly payment today and again told us they will ask their seniors about the cancellation procedure without any further progress. Now we don't know if we can get a refund on this processed payment. This is not fair as we've been urgently trying to get a hold of any staff that can help us with this matter.
UPDATE 2: My parents were told that OTA won’t provide a full refund and proposed a counter offer that will still end up costing my parents more than half of the original contracted price. We’re looking around for legal advice in our vicinity and I’m definitely still looking into my other options. I haven’t received any updates on this matter from OTA even though I followed up with them.
UPDATE 3: After many months of the FTC pursuing a lawsuit against OTA, they won. OTA has a lot of shit to pay for and I’m hoping my parents can be eligible for compensation. https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/companies/online-trading-academy-deceived-customers-for-years-ftc-says/ar-BB194yVM
TLDR; my parents signed a contract for a 33k investment trading course. We’re past the time limit of trying to getting a refund. The contract doesn't state any cancellation option. OTA got their asses handed to them by the FTC and now hoping for a partial refund.
submitted by shivi47 to legaladvicecanada [link] [comments]

Reduce Output And Price, Now Is The End Of OPEC?

Reduce Output And Price, Now Is The End Of OPEC?

Photo: Internet
Since the outbreak of COVID-19 in 2020, the global economy has entered a recession, with gold soaring, stock markets tumbling, and oil prices plummeting.
Saudi Arabia cut pricing for oil sales to Asia and the U.S. for October shipments, and the reduction exceeded last month.
Global daily oil consumption (total liquid volume) broke the "100 million barrels" mark for the first time in 2019, reaching 10.96 million barrels. It means the global daily consumption is more than 100 million barrels, and the annual consumption is more than 5 billion tons.
Since the outbreak of COVID-19, fuel demand has decreased significantly, while global oil supply has continued to increase.
Global oil consumption has decreased by nearly a quarter due to COVID-19. The global daily oil consumption level in the second quarter of this year was less than 77 million barrels, which is almost 20 years ago.
20th April saw WTI oil prices plunge from $17.85 to -$37.63, more than a 300% drop, the largest one day drop for U.S. crude in history.
The oil prices up and down in history, and various factors impact the oil prices. One of the most critical factors is OPEC.
The Birth of OPEC
The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) is a permanent, intergovernmental Organization created at the Baghdad Conference on September 10–14, 1960, by Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Venezuela.
Before the OPEC, the Seven Sisters (E Anglo-Iranian Oil Company, Gulf Oil, Royal Dutch Shell, Chevron, ExxonMobil, Socony, Standard Oil Company of New York, and Texaco) controlled the world's oil markets.
In the 1950s, coal was the most critical fuel globally, but oil consumption increased rapidly, and demand continued to grow. In 1959, the United States' Seven Sisters lowered the price of oil produced in Venezuela and the Middle East by 10% to reduce the United States' price.
To counter the U.S. oil monopoly, OPEC was born.
OPEC's 13 members control approximately 30% of global oil supplies and 79.4% of proven reserves. OPEC member nations produce about 42% of the world's crude oil, and OPEC's oil exports account for roughly 60% of the total petroleum traded worldwide.

Photo: OPEC
Impact of OPEC on Oil Prices
Within the OPEC group, Saudi Arabia is the largest crude oil producer in the world and remains the most dominant member of OPEC, with each instance of a cut in oil production by them, resulting in a sharp rise in oil prices, and vice versa.
Additionally, the 'kingdom of Saud' is also the leading exporter of crude oil globally. Since 2000, all historical instances since the 1973 Arab oil embargo indicate that Saudi Arabia has maintained its upper hand in the oil market. It calls the shots in determining crude oil prices by controlling supply.
All major oil price fluctuations in recent history can be clearly attributed to production levels from Saudi Arabia, along with other OPEC nations.
Is it now the end of OPEC?
The success of shale oil and the plunge in oil prices in 2014 are signs that OPEC has declined.
Since 2014, U.S. shale oil has created a boom in domestic crude oil production. Shale oil comprises more than a third of the onshore production of crude oil in the lower 48 states. It drove U.S. oil output from 8.8 million barrels per day in 2014 to a record 12.2 million barrels a day in 2019.
As a result, the United States became the world's largest crude-oil producer.

Photo: EIA

Photo: EIA
Today the U.S., Saudi Arabia, and Russia rank among the top three in world oil production.

Photo: EIA

Photo: EIA

In November 2014, despite the appeals of other OPEC members to cut production, Saudi Arabia suddenly increased production sharply, trying to defeat U.S. shale oil companies through the competitive increase in OPEC member states. But American shale oil survived strongly by borrowing, and it became more efficient, and production costs were greatly reduced.
During this time, Saudi Arabia's economy is declining rapidly. Saudi Arabia had the highest government deficit in history-98 billion U.S. dollars, accounting for 15% of GDP in 2015.
In 2016, Saudi Arabia led OPEC and Russia to reach an OPEC+ production reduction agreement. Since then, oil prices have steadily rebounded. At the same time, Saudi Arabia has begun to consider taking advantage of high oil prices to list Saudi Aramco to ease domestic financial difficulties.
During this period, OPEC +'s reduction in production has rescued U.S. shale oil again. The production capacity of shale oil has increased sharply by 4 million barrels per day, surpassing Saudi Arabia, and Russia.
So far, the OPEC structure and cohesion continues to divide and elude.
On 8th March 2020, Saudi Arabia initiated a price war with Russia, facilitating a 65% quarterly fall in the price of oil. The price war was triggered by a break-up in dialogue between the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and Russia over proposed oil-production cuts in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic. Russia walked out of the agreement, leading to the fall of the OPEC+ alliance.
While past oil shocks have been driven by either supply or demand, the price collapse of 2020 is highly unusual in oil market history: It results from a massive demand shock and a huge supply overhang at the same time.


https://preview.redd.it/2smucmlke1n51.png?width=686&format=png&auto=webp&s=63932270640be1913c8d41214418073a57b1646a

https://preview.redd.it/34m0nn3me1n51.png?width=686&format=png&auto=webp&s=6519e7614205955da1fe6b02437048ec461249dc
For more information please download “TOP 1 Markets” at APP store or google play.
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.top1.trading.forex.commodity.cryptocurrency.indices
top1markets:
https://itunes.apple.com/my/app/id1461741702
top one:
https://itunes.apple.com/tw/app/id1506200136
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ACCA F9 Foreign Exchange Risk Management – Forward ... Currency Swap and Forex Swap - Indian Economy by Vivek ... Forex4Newbies - YouTube Currency Swap Agreement Explained with Example - YouTube FX Forward contract valuation - YouTube How To Trade Futures For Beginners  The Basics of Futures ...

International Foreign Exchange Master Agreement - IFEMA: An agreement set forth by the Foreign Exchange Committee that reflects the best practices for transactions in the foreign exchange market ... This Trading Agreement (hereafter the “Agreement”) applies to the business relationship between FXCL Markets Ltd. (hereafter the “Company”) and the Client unless special stipulations or agreements were made. Any reference to a Client in this Agreement shall include individuals, corporate bodies, unincorporated associations, and ... Forex trading involves significant risk of loss and is not suitable for all investors. Full Disclosure. Spot Gold and Silver contracts are not subject to regulation under the U.S. Commodity Exchange Act. *Increasing leverage increases risk. GAIN Capital Group LLC (dba FOREX.com) 135 US Hwy 202/206 Bedminster NJ 07921, USA. GAIN Capital Group ... international Forex Market and derivatives markets to any uridical entity or individual, hereinafter referred to as the Client in the order and on the terms governed by this Agreement. This Agreement is a web-based document which does not need to be signed. The Agreement comes into effect at the moment of acceptance by the Client. The Forex Investor represents that he/she is free to enter into this Agreement, and that this agreement does not violate the terms of any agreement between the Forex Investor and any third party. Further, the Forex Investor, in carrying out this agreement shall not utilize inventions, discoveries, developments, innovations, literary or artistic works or any other matters subject to protection ... For purposes of this Agreement ‘churning’ is defined as any form of excessive trading conducted for the purpose of increasing Trading Agent’s commissions, rather than to further the customer’s investment goals. Upon the finding of misconduct, as reasonably determined by Tradeview, commissions, fees and/or profit sharing due to the Trading Agent may be withheld pending a claim by the ... Forex trading involves significant risk of loss and is not suitable for all investors. Full Disclosure. Spot Gold and Silver contracts are not subject to regulation under the U.S. Commodity Exchange Act. *Increasing leverage increases risk. GAIN Capital Group LLC (dba FOREX.com) 135 US Hwy 202/206 Bedminster NJ 07921, USA. GAIN Capital Group ... This Offer Agreement allows the client to use the trading strategy, when the group of up to 5 deals with one trading instrument is being hedged by the counter group of deals, which is the stream hedging. However, in case it is found out, that one strategy or its modifications are being mass used and there are more than 5 deals in each group, the Company will consider this as the violation of ... EASY FOREX CLIENT AGREEMENT - Standard "Terms and Conditions" This Client Agreement, as amended from time to time, will take effect from July 28 2016. 1. Scope of this Agreement 1.1 This Agreement determines the contractual relationship between the Company ("we") and the Client ("you"). You should read the agreement carefully, understand and agree with the terms and conditions before you enter ... Find the latest Forex client agreement with our company! Client, IB agreements, trading regulations and all other essential documents for your comfortable trading.

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ACCA F9 Foreign Exchange Risk Management – Forward ...

ACCA F9 Foreign Exchange Risk Management – Forward contracts Free lectures for the ACCA F9 Financial Management To benefit from this lecture, visit opentuiti... This Channel build for Forex traders who want to success in market. This Channel will provide the basics and easy trade systems/strategies , but full of effi... The Basics of Futures Trading Class 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e6DGIsl_pXw The Basics of Futures Trading Class 3: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4uu... Indian Economy by Vivek Singh General Studies Foundation Batch - Target 2020 Batch Start Date - 06 May, 2019 Batch Timings - 8AM to 10:30AM Website : http://... Shopping. Tap to unmute. If playback doesn't begin shortly, try restarting your device. Up Next. Cancel. Autoplay is paused. You're signed out. Videos you watch may be added to the TV's watch ... I'm showing two ways how to value a FX forward contract.

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